Brinkmanship

NOUN (1)

1. the policy of pushing a dangerous situation to the brink of disaster (to the limits of safety); (freedictionary.org)

John Foster Dulles, 52nd Secretary of State
John Foster Dulles, 52nd Secretary of State

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:
brinkmanship \brink”man*ship\, brinksmanship \brinks”man*ship\n. [brink + -manship. (1956).] the policy or practise of pushing a dangerous situation to the brink of disaster (to the limits of safety), in order to achieve the most advantageous outcome; used especially of diplomatic maneuvers in crisis situations, and originally applied to the policies of John Foster Dulles under President Eisenhower. [WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Aside to the post Brinkmanship
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Did 47 Republican senators break the law in plain sight?

Senator Tom Cotton, Arizona (Rep)
Senator Tom Cotton, Arizona (Rep)

Washington (CNN)   “Forty-seven Senate Republicans may have broken the law this week. But no one’s losing any sleep over it. Pundits and legal scholars are raising questions over whether  Sen. Tom Cotton and the 46 Senate Republicans violated the Logan Act when they penned a letter to Iran’s leaders on Monday, undercutting President Barack Obama‘s efforts to negotiate a nuclear agreement with those same leaders. The law, passed in 1799, forbids any U.S. citizen — acting without official U.S. authority — from influencing “disputes or controversies” involving the U.S. and a foreign government.” …read more as CNN

© 2015 Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Unregenerate

From our new word source, Vocabulary for College I by Paul B. Diederich and Sydell Terris Carlton, 1965.

The previous owner of the workbook composed his use-this-word-in-a-sentence assignment this way: “The Puritans viewed all who didn’t go to church as unregenerate.

Unregenerate
ADJECTIVE
Wicked, sinful, or unrepentant. Even after the chaplain’s frequent visits, the condemned man remained unregenerate.

Pander

From our new word source, Vocabulary for College I by Paul B. Diederich and Sydell Terris Carlton, 1965.
The previous owner of the workbook composed his use-this-word-in-a-sentence assignment this way: “The magazine pandered to the lowest tastes.

Pander
VERB
To supply material or opportunity for vices, or to act as a go-between in love intrigues. The scandal sheet pandered to the low taste of its subscribers.

The Free Dictionary Online: Pander
1. To act as a go-between or liaison in sexual intrigues; function as a procurer.
2. To cater to the lower tastes and desires of others or exploit their weaknesses: “He refused to pander to nostalgia and escapism” (New York Times).

Rapacity

From our new word source, Vocabulary for College I by Paul B. Diederich and Sydell Terris Carlton, 1965.

The previous owner of the workbook composed his use-this-word-in-a-sentence assignment this way: “His rapacity was matched only by his parsimony.

Rapacity
NOUN
Excessive greed; or a disposition to seize and carry off.  The rapacity of the bandits was not satisfied until they took all we had.

Merriam Webster Online: “Rapacity–the quality of being rapacious”

Rapacious
ADJECTIVE
: always wanting more money, possessions, etc. : wanting more than is needed or deserved — Merriam Webster Online

Our New Word Source

While running a completely un-3freewordsaday errand last week, I stumbled upon a gem of a word book. (I do actually troll for new word sources, but not on this day.) I found the book in a most unlikely place, a place one might not think a book would even be. And guess how much it cost me. Exactly $1.50.

As you might have guessed, I have a plethora of bookshelves in my home office. And they are bursting. So I thought I might stack the overflow in shallow cupboards above the existing cases. (I chose cupboards instead of shelves because I have cats.) Our local Habitat for Humanity reclamation centers offer salvaged and new home fixtures for sale.

I wasn’t surprised to find an oak cupboard (for $15) that matched the oak bookcase above which I wanted to shelve excess books. I was, however, surprised to find books for sale in another part of the building. Hard cover books $3, soft cover books $1.50. Of course I browsed. And what did I find? Vocabulary for College I by Paul B. Diederich and Sydell Terris Carlton. Publication date, 1965. If I were to guess, I’d guess that the books I saw were salvaged from estate situations. I bought others that are not relevant to this blog but are very nice. So along with the wooden casement windows and other vintage fixtures, refurbishers are reclaiming household items as well. Thanks to them we now have a book that outlines a college level vocabulary!

7 Annoying Words That Should Die A Horrible Death

I have to agree…usage-wise.

101 Books

Time Magazine recently released a list of 15 words that should die in 2012. The list included some rather annoying, trendy words and phrases from 2011—like baby bump, occupy (wait, wasn’t that Time’s word of the year?), bro (as in “bromance” and “bro date”), and sexting.

Those, indeed, are extremely annoying words. But I think I can do better. As an avid book reader, writer, and Twitterererer, I’d like to think I know a few things about words.

So, with a tip of the cap to our friends at Time, I present 7 trendy words or phrases that should die a miserable death in 2012. (Of note, this list is different from the words that make me cringe—which are time-honored words that have been auditory nuisances since they were first spoken).

View original post 719 more words

“Grow”

As in “a grow”–one or more marijuana plants in a delineated area under intentional cultivation.

Yes, it is January 1, 2014 in America and that means new laws go into effect and old laws go off the books. And in one state in the Union the buying, selling, and using of marijuana (if you’re over 21) is now legal for recreation. However you feel about this, you are here at 3freewordsaday to upgrade your vocabulary and today is the appropriate time to learn the usage of a marijuana grow.

The term has been in the vernacular of the underground industry of buying and selling marijuana for years. Now it is coming into the mainstream as the industry comes into legality. But it has yet to enter the dictionaries save for the Urban Dictionary.com and there incorrectly and as slang with other definitions.

A grow is a NOUN. And apart from the heretofore slang usage of the term for any number of things, it is used by the DEA to mean a segment of soil or water wherein the intentional cultivation of marijuana plants takes place, whether illegally or legally.

Happy New Year…

Resolution

Resolution (NOUN) as in New Year’s Resolution–likely the best known usage of the word, at least to American ears–is listed third of six definitions/usages on Merriam Webster.com.  And if dictionaries are compiled the way they were when I was in junior high, that means the further down you travel in the list of definitions, the less used that iteration of the term is used. To put it more straightforward, the first definition is the most prevalent version in that language–here American English–and so on down. Some of the definitions of resolution include analyzing, answering, or determining as in an act of resolving; a formal expression of opinion; and the measure of the sharpness of an image such as on a computer screen.

Entry number three reads: (3a actually)  “something that is resolved <made a resolution to mend my ways>.” From this definition we get our first-of-the-year custom of resolving to do something to better our lives in the upcoming 365 days. (You can view all six definitions at m-w.com.)

3freewordsadaynotebook3

Challenge!
Do you make a New Year’s Resolution?
If you do (or have in the past), you can share it with our followers!
Just write it in the comment box for this blog entry.

Penchant

When someone has a strong liking for something they have a penchant for it. This doesn’t just mean a strong liking of favorite foods or of a particular sport. It can mean a strong leaning toward a political party or a way of life (He has a penchant for slovenliness.).  Penchant for an activity can also mean a talent for it.

Definitions: thefreedictionary.com

Penchant
NOUN
A definite liking; a strong inclination. See Synonyms at predilection.
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
a strong inclination or liking; bent or taste
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

a strong inclination, taste, or liking for something.
Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Collectible vs. Collectable

In short, one word means objects people collect while the other means objects that can be collected–and is a variant of the first word.

Collectible means objects people collect.  Comic books are collectibles. They are also collectable; able to be collected. Collectable is a variant of collectible, but some people still argue that it is properly used as defined above because some collectors collect things that have value only to them while a collectible has a monetary/market value.

Definitions:

Collectible
ADJECTIVE
The definition of collectible is able to be brought together into a series.
An example of collectible used as an adjective is the phrase collectible coins which means coins that people collect.

NOUN
A collectible is defined as one of a group of objects that people collect.
An example of a collectible is the stuffed toy called a Beanie Baby.

Collectable–Variant of collectible.
ADJECTIVE
that can be collected
suitable or desirable for collecting, as by a hobbyist

NOUN
any of a class of old things, but not antiques, that people collect as a hobby, specif. a thing of no great intrinsic value

yourdictionary.com

yourdictionary.com The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th edition Copyright © 2010 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Webster’s New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio. Used by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Enriched vs. Fortified

Back in the day, the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) in America determined that since the populace was eating so much processed carbohydrates such as bread, pasta, cereals that those companies who produced these items must begin to add nutrients to them. There are two types of this process: enrich and fortify.

Determining the difference between these two terms isn’t always easy. The Academy of Nutrition and Diatetics explains it this way: “Both terms mean that nutrients have been added to make the food more nutritious. Enriched means nutrients that were lost during food processing have been added back. An example is adding back certain vitamins lost in processing wheat to make white flour. Fortified means vitamins or minerals have been added to a food that weren’t originally in the food. An example is adding vitamin D to milk.

Dictionaries have trouble with these terms.  Enrich and fortify are both VERBS, but enriched and fortified are ADJECTIVES as in fortified juice and enriched bread.

“To enrich is defined as to improve something or make something better.

When you go to college and learn a lot of new facts and information, this is an example of a situation where you enrich your mind.
When you add extra vitamins to orange juice, this is an example of a time when you enrich the juice with vitamins.
When your uncle leaves you $500, this is an example of a time when you enrich your available cash.”
YourDictionary definition and usage example. Copyright © 2013 by LoveToKnow Corp.

Fortify is defined as follows by Merriam-Webster.com:

: to make strong: as
a : to strengthen and secure (as a town) by forts or batteries
b : to give physical strength, courage, or endurance to <fortified by a hearty meal>
c : to add mental or moral strength to : encourage <fortified by prayer>
d : to add material to for strengthening or enriching <fortified milk>
Merriam-Webster.com

Insular

Insular defined: ADJECTIVE

1. of or pertaining to an island or islands.
2. dwelling or situated on an island.
3. forming an island: insular rocks.
4. detached; isolated.
5. of or characteristic of islanders.
6. narrow-minded or illiberal; provincial: insular attitudes.
7. Pathol. characterized by isolated spots or patches.
8. Anat. of or pertaining to islands of tissue, as the islets of Langerhans.

The Free Dictionary.com/Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Ordnance vs. Ordinance

As explosive as they might seem, ordinances are not weapons by which to cause physical damage. They are decreesboom or laws made to bring the populace under a suitable form of conformity. Ordnance on the other hand are indeed intended to cause explosive results.

Ordnance defined: 1a : military supplies including weapons, ammunition, combat vehicles, and maintenance tools and equipment b : a service of the army charged with the procuring, distributing, and safekeeping of ordnance 2: cannon, artillery–Merriam-Webster.com

Ordinance defined: 1a : an authoritative decree or direction : order b : a law set forth by a governmental authority; specifically : a municipal regulation 2: something ordained or decreed by fate or a deity 3: a prescribed usage, practice, or ceremony–Merriam-Webster.com

Invoke vs. Evoke

Invoke–“The definition of invoke is to call on someone or something to help or inspire you. An example of invoke is trying to contact someone who died.

To invoke is defined as to emotionally ask for something. An example of to invoke is a charity group asking for money.

Invoke means to put something to use. An example of to invoke is to use city code to argue a disagreement with a policeman.”  VERB

YourDictionary definition and usage example. Copyright © 2013 by LoveToKnow Corp.

Evoke–“The definition of evoke is to call forth, or imagine. An example of evoke is your wedding song bringing back memories of your wedding reception.”  VERB

YourDictionary definition and usage example. Copyright © 2013 by LoveToKnow Corp.

Nuanced

Nuance defined:

Challenge: Use "nuanced" in a sentence tomorrow. Share it here!
Challenge: Use “nuanced” in a sentence tomorrow. Share it here!

1. A subtle or slight degree of difference, as in meaning, feeling, or tone; a gradation.
2. Expression or appreciation of subtle shades of meaning, feeling, or tone: a rich artistic performance, full of nuance.–The Free Dictionary.com

Nuanced is an adjective describing something having these characteristics.

Ratiocination

The father of detective fiction, Edgar Allan Poe, coined a word. Like his works, it is large and sometimes unfathomable. Ratiocination means “reasoning abilitypoe (‘ratiocination’ traces to ‘ratio,’ Latin for ‘reason’ or ‘computation’, Merriam-Webster.com)” and describes the process by which reason and exact thinking bring about solution.

A few Poe facts
Poe was not in fact a maudlin person. He had quite the sense of humor. He did not die of a drug overdose. Some think he succumbed to rabies, as he had a fondness for cats and kept several as pets. What exists as Poe lore was published after his death in a biography written by a rival.

Conflation

Conflation defined: a combining, as of two variant readings of a text into a composite reading.

Origin: ME conflacioun < LL conflatio < L conflare, to blow together < com-, together + flare, to blow
NOUNYour Dictionary.com/Webster’s New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio.
Used by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

blend, fusion; especially :  a composite reading or text.
Examples of CONFLATION: the word “robustious” is probably a conflation of “robust” and “boisterous”–Merriam Webster.com

See also on 3freewordsaday: amalgam.

Click on the link at the bottom of this post to revisit "amalgam."
Click on the link at the bottom of this
post to revisit “amalgam.”