Brinkmanship

NOUN (1)

1. the policy of pushing a dangerous situation to the brink of disaster (to the limits of safety); (freedictionary.org)

John Foster Dulles, 52nd Secretary of State
John Foster Dulles, 52nd Secretary of State

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:
brinkmanship \brink”man*ship\, brinksmanship \brinks”man*ship\n. [brink + -manship. (1956).] the policy or practise of pushing a dangerous situation to the brink of disaster (to the limits of safety), in order to achieve the most advantageous outcome; used especially of diplomatic maneuvers in crisis situations, and originally applied to the policies of John Foster Dulles under President Eisenhower. [WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Aside to the post Brinkmanship
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Did 47 Republican senators break the law in plain sight?

Senator Tom Cotton, Arizona (Rep)
Senator Tom Cotton, Arizona (Rep)

Washington (CNN)   “Forty-seven Senate Republicans may have broken the law this week. But no one’s losing any sleep over it. Pundits and legal scholars are raising questions over whether  Sen. Tom Cotton and the 46 Senate Republicans violated the Logan Act when they penned a letter to Iran’s leaders on Monday, undercutting President Barack Obama‘s efforts to negotiate a nuclear agreement with those same leaders. The law, passed in 1799, forbids any U.S. citizen — acting without official U.S. authority — from influencing “disputes or controversies” involving the U.S. and a foreign government.” …read more as CNN

© 2015 Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Advertisements

“Grow”

As in “a grow”–one or more marijuana plants in a delineated area under intentional cultivation.

Yes, it is January 1, 2014 in America and that means new laws go into effect and old laws go off the books. And in one state in the Union the buying, selling, and using of marijuana (if you’re over 21) is now legal for recreation. However you feel about this, you are here at 3freewordsaday to upgrade your vocabulary and today is the appropriate time to learn the usage of a marijuana grow.

The term has been in the vernacular of the underground industry of buying and selling marijuana for years. Now it is coming into the mainstream as the industry comes into legality. But it has yet to enter the dictionaries save for the Urban Dictionary.com and there incorrectly and as slang with other definitions.

A grow is a NOUN. And apart from the heretofore slang usage of the term for any number of things, it is used by the DEA to mean a segment of soil or water wherein the intentional cultivation of marijuana plants takes place, whether illegally or legally.

Happy New Year…

Insular

Insular defined: ADJECTIVE

1. of or pertaining to an island or islands.
2. dwelling or situated on an island.
3. forming an island: insular rocks.
4. detached; isolated.
5. of or characteristic of islanders.
6. narrow-minded or illiberal; provincial: insular attitudes.
7. Pathol. characterized by isolated spots or patches.
8. Anat. of or pertaining to islands of tissue, as the islets of Langerhans.

The Free Dictionary.com/Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Nuanced

Nuance defined:

Challenge: Use "nuanced" in a sentence tomorrow. Share it here!
Challenge: Use “nuanced” in a sentence tomorrow. Share it here!

1. A subtle or slight degree of difference, as in meaning, feeling, or tone; a gradation.
2. Expression or appreciation of subtle shades of meaning, feeling, or tone: a rich artistic performance, full of nuance.–The Free Dictionary.com

Nuanced is an adjective describing something having these characteristics.

Conflation

Conflation defined: a combining, as of two variant readings of a text into a composite reading.

Origin: ME conflacioun < LL conflatio < L conflare, to blow together < com-, together + flare, to blow
NOUNYour Dictionary.com/Webster’s New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio.
Used by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

blend, fusion; especially :  a composite reading or text.
Examples of CONFLATION: the word “robustious” is probably a conflation of “robust” and “boisterous”–Merriam Webster.com

See also on 3freewordsaday: amalgam.

Click on the link at the bottom of this post to revisit "amalgam."
Click on the link at the bottom of this
post to revisit “amalgam.”

Ex Post Facto

Ex post facto means “after the fact.” A good example is someone trying to change the rules of a game after it’s already begun.

Challenge: Use "ex post facto" in a sentence tomorrow. Share it here!
Challenge: Use “ex post facto” in a sentence tomorrow. Share it here!

Ex post facto defined: “something that affects things that happened in the past. When a law changes the zoning rules and applies even to zoning decisions that were made in the past, it is an

example of an ex post facto change to the zoning laws.” ADJECTIVE–Your Dictionary.com Such a change is considered retroactive.

Origin of ex post facto
Late Latin, literally, from a thing done afterward.
First Known Use: 1621–Merriam Webster.com

Intervene, Ascribe, Counterpart

Intervene defined:
1. To come, appear, or lie between two things: You can’t see the lake from there because the house intervenes.
2. To come or occur between two periods or points of time: A year intervened between the two dynasties.
3. To occur as an extraneous or unplanned circumstance: He would have his degree by now if his laziness hadn’t intervened.
4. a. To involve oneself in a situation so as to alter or hinder an action or development: “Every gardener faces choices about how and how much to intervene in nature’s processes” (Dora Galitzki).
b. To interfere, usually through force or threat of force, in the affairs of another nation.
5. Law To enter into a suit as a third party for one’s own interests. INTRANSITIVE VERB–The Free Dictionary.com/The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

—————

Ascribe defined:
1. to credit or assign, as to a particular origin or period to ascribe parts of a play to Shakespeare
2. to attribute as a quality; consider as belonging to to ascribe beauty to youth [from Latin ascrībere to enrol, from ad in addition + scrībere to write] TRANSITIVE VERB–The Free Dictionary.com/Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

—————-

Counterpart defined:
1. a person or thing closely resembling another, esp. in function.
2. a copy or duplicate, as of a legal document.
3. 
one of two parts that fit, complete, or complement one another. NOUN–The Free Dictionary.com/Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Discriminate, Implore, Debacle

Discriminate is defined as to recognize or see the difference between two or more people or things. An example of discriminate is a dress maker seeing the height difference between two bridesmaids and making adjustments accordingly. The definition of discriminate is to show partiality or prejudice based on a general category not on individual merit. An example of discriminate is to refuse to rent an apartment to a black man because he is black.” VERB–Your Dictionary.com

——————-

“The definition of implore is to beg or plead. An example of implore is when you beg and plead for a loaf of bread when you are hungry.” VERB–Your Dictionary.com

to ask or beg earnestly for; beseech
to ask or beg (a person) to do something; entreat TRANSITIVE VERB–Your Dictionary.com/Webster’s New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio.
Used by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

——————-

“The definition of a debacle is a sudden downfall or a total failure. An example of a debacle is a poorly run political campaign that ends in overwhelming defeat.” NOUN–Your Dictionary.com

Shoehorned

Shoehorned fits into the 3freewordsaday Words Heard category. It is not a word that was first heard today; but it was heard today on CNN in an appropriately descriptive use. The news host referred to the “pork” slipped into the new resolution as having been shoehorned.

To shoehorn something is to “force to be included or admitted <shoehorned irrelevant arguments into his essay>.” TRANSITIVE VERB–Merriam-Webster.com

Dovetail

(c)K.R. Sprague, 2013
Collecting words means carrying a notebook and pen/pencil. I prefer the pencil since erasures equal saved space; mark-outs take up space.

I’m a fan of Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda. But I was a fan the first season! At any rate, it being a true crime/police investigational series it affords numerous opportunities to pick up good vocabulary words. Even if the words aren’t that complex. (I was going to say not that “highbrowed,” but that implies the Lt. and the show are unsophisticated and that’s not the case. Large vocabularies require special attention to usage. With great power comes great responsibility!)

In last night’s episode, Lt. Kenda described a suspect’s statement as “dovetailing” with the known facts of the case. It’s a very descriptive term, illustrating the degree and the quality of the congruity of the statement with the known facts. It brings to mind a precise fit.

Dovetail defined: TRANSITIVE VERB

to join or fasten together by means of dovetails; to piece together (facts, etc.) so as to make a logically connected whole

INTRANSITIVE VERB

to fit together closely or logically–Your Dictionary.com/Webster’s New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio.  Used by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

 

Exponential, Overspread, Veritable

I’m attempting to stick to good internet form here and combine the extra 3freewords into a single post; the better to not flood the inboxes of my loyal and tolerant followers. And there are two bonus words on the 3freewordsaday Facebook page instead of the usual one.

Exponential (ADJECTIVE)

Oft heard (and spoken) but rarely used literally, exponential is another word–like tangential–that has entered the mainstream voice from a mathematical field of study. Recall calculus from an earlier post.

Exponential defined: Relating to a mathematical expression containing one or more exponents.  Something is said to increase or decrease exponentially if its rate of change must be expressed using exponents. A graph of such a rate would appear not as a straight line, but as a curve that continually becomes steeper or shallower.–The Free Dictionary.com/The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Exponential refers to a large number in smaller terms, or something that is increasing at a faster and faster rate.

An example of exponential is 25 being shown as 5×5. An example of exponential is the erosion that is happening on the Holderness coast in eastern England.–Your Dictionary.com

Overspread (NOUN)

  • <the butter should evenly overspread the baking pan>
  • <autumn leaves overspreading one another on the lawn to form a colorful mosaic>--Merriam-Webster.com

Veritable (ADJECTIVE)

1. (intensifier; usually qualifying a word used metaphorically) he’s a veritable swine!

2. Rare genuine or true; proper I require veritable proof

Tangential

To go off on a tangent isn’t quite the same as the illustrations of Adult Attention Deficit Disorder on e-cards: I was just sitting there and suddenly…oh, look bacon! But to do so can make it difficult to get the train of though back on the track, as it were. It is an ADJECTIVE.

Tangential explained: “Touching lightly; incidental.

As far as Katherine was concerned, everything else was tangential to her own plans.

Someone who starts talking about one thing and gets sidetracked has gone off on a tangent. (In geometry, a tangent is a straight line that touches a curve at a single point.) The new subject is tangential to the first subject–it ‘touches’ it lightly and moves off in a different direction. A few of the people we meet truly enter out lives, but most acquaintances remain only tangential.”

–Merriam-Webster’s Vocabulary Builder, 1998

Paradigm

Paradigm defined: a widely accepted example, belief or concept. NOUN

  1. An example of paradigm is evolution.
  2. An example of paradigm is the earth being round.
  • a pattern, example, or model
  • an overall concept accepted by most people in an intellectual community, as those in one of the natural sciences, because of its effectiveness in explaining a complex process, idea, or set of data
  • GRAM. an example of a declension or conjugation, giving all the inflectional forms of a word

Your Dictionary.com/Webster’s New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio.
Used by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

 

Sublimate

Defined:  1. to divert the energy of (a sexual or other biological impulse) from its immediate goal to one of a more acceptable social, moral, or aesthetic nature or use.  2. a. to sublime (a solid substance); extract by this process.  b. to refine or purify (a substance).  3. to make nobler or purer.  TRANSITIVE VERB

The Free Dictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.)

Yesterday’s 3wordsaday: Mellifluous, Superfluous, Dichotomy

Mellifluous Defined:  1 : having a smooth rich flow <a mellifluous voice> 2 : filled with something (as honey) that sweetens  ADJECTIVE

Merriam-Webster.com

Superfluous Defined:  The definition of superfluous is something that is more than needed or unnecessary. An example of superfluous is a buying a stuffed animal for a child who already has too many stuffed animals.  ADJECTIVE

Your Dictionary.com

Dichotomy Defined:  1. Division into two usually contradictory parts or opinions: “the dichotomy of the one and the many” (Louis Auchincloss). 2. Astronomy The phase of the moon, Mercury, or Venus when half of the disk is illuminated. 3. Botany Branching characterized by successive forking into two approximately equal divisions. NOUN

The Free Dictionary.com (The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.)

I’m going to use my sweet (mellifluous) voice (errr, words) and apologize over and over and over again (superfluous) for not posting yesterday’s three words on my 3freewordsaday (dichotomy) blog.  And postscript, you can never have too many stuffed animals.

Snarky

Defined:  The definition of snarky is someone who is cranky, snide or sarcastic.  Saying “nice haircut” in a sarcastic and snide way is an example of a comment that would be described as snarky.  A person who hates traveling who is packing to go on a trip and who is complaining about it every step of the way is an example of someone who is snarky.  ADJECTIVE

Your Dictionary.com

Aside to the Post Snarky
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
This template does not support asides.
So, this is how I will make them.

If you are wondering why I tend toward
using Your Dictionary.com definitions over other sources
it’s because, firstly, they boil down definitions from many
dictionaries making each term more understandable
than a mere definition. Secondly, I got a bit miffed at
Merriam-Webster.com (my usual first choice) when I learned
that to access some words, money must change hands.
words and post them here. I don’t believe in
charging for dictionary definitions.

Due diligence

Defined:  1: the care that a reasonable person exercises to avoid harm to other persons or their property  2: research and analysis of a company or organization done in preparation for a business transaction (as a corporate merger or purchase of securities)  NOUN

Meriam-Webster.com

Diligence Defined:  the quality of being diligent; constant, careful effort; perseverance  NOUN

–Webster’s New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio.  Used by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

This term came to me via my husband.  He’s a Deputy Sheriff but was assigned to the Sheriff’s Information Technology section for several years.  About a year ago I used it during a crisis in my neighborhood and was surprised and pleased to hear it repeated by at least three people involved!  The crisis cleared up and we’re all fine thanks.  But the phenomenon got me thinking that this type of word of mouth might make a fun experiment.  I’ve included a page on 3freewordsaday to list test words and phrases and to publish readers’ experiments.