Intervene, Ascribe, Counterpart

Intervene defined:
1. To come, appear, or lie between two things: You can’t see the lake from there because the house intervenes.
2. To come or occur between two periods or points of time: A year intervened between the two dynasties.
3. To occur as an extraneous or unplanned circumstance: He would have his degree by now if his laziness hadn’t intervened.
4. a. To involve oneself in a situation so as to alter or hinder an action or development: “Every gardener faces choices about how and how much to intervene in nature’s processes” (Dora Galitzki).
b. To interfere, usually through force or threat of force, in the affairs of another nation.
5. Law To enter into a suit as a third party for one’s own interests. INTRANSITIVE VERB–The Free Dictionary.com/The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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Ascribe defined:
1. to credit or assign, as to a particular origin or period to ascribe parts of a play to Shakespeare
2. to attribute as a quality; consider as belonging to to ascribe beauty to youth [from Latin ascrībere to enrol, from ad in addition + scrībere to write] TRANSITIVE VERB–The Free Dictionary.com/Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

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Counterpart defined:
1. a person or thing closely resembling another, esp. in function.
2. a copy or duplicate, as of a legal document.
3. 
one of two parts that fit, complete, or complement one another. NOUN–The Free Dictionary.com/Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Discriminate, Implore, Debacle

Discriminate is defined as to recognize or see the difference between two or more people or things. An example of discriminate is a dress maker seeing the height difference between two bridesmaids and making adjustments accordingly. The definition of discriminate is to show partiality or prejudice based on a general category not on individual merit. An example of discriminate is to refuse to rent an apartment to a black man because he is black.” VERB–Your Dictionary.com

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“The definition of implore is to beg or plead. An example of implore is when you beg and plead for a loaf of bread when you are hungry.” VERB–Your Dictionary.com

to ask or beg earnestly for; beseech
to ask or beg (a person) to do something; entreat TRANSITIVE VERB–Your Dictionary.com/Webster’s New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio.
Used by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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“The definition of a debacle is a sudden downfall or a total failure. An example of a debacle is a poorly run political campaign that ends in overwhelming defeat.” NOUN–Your Dictionary.com

Shoehorned

Shoehorned fits into the 3freewordsaday Words Heard category. It is not a word that was first heard today; but it was heard today on CNN in an appropriately descriptive use. The news host referred to the “pork” slipped into the new resolution as having been shoehorned.

To shoehorn something is to “force to be included or admitted <shoehorned irrelevant arguments into his essay>.” TRANSITIVE VERB–Merriam-Webster.com

Dovetail

(c)K.R. Sprague, 2013
Collecting words means carrying a notebook and pen/pencil. I prefer the pencil since erasures equal saved space; mark-outs take up space.

I’m a fan of Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda. But I was a fan the first season! At any rate, it being a true crime/police investigational series it affords numerous opportunities to pick up good vocabulary words. Even if the words aren’t that complex. (I was going to say not that “highbrowed,” but that implies the Lt. and the show are unsophisticated and that’s not the case. Large vocabularies require special attention to usage. With great power comes great responsibility!)

In last night’s episode, Lt. Kenda described a suspect’s statement as “dovetailing” with the known facts of the case. It’s a very descriptive term, illustrating the degree and the quality of the congruity of the statement with the known facts. It brings to mind a precise fit.

Dovetail defined: TRANSITIVE VERB

to join or fasten together by means of dovetails; to piece together (facts, etc.) so as to make a logically connected whole

INTRANSITIVE VERB

to fit together closely or logically–Your Dictionary.com/Webster’s New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio.  Used by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

 

Permeate

Permeate defined:  TRANSITIVE VERB

1. to pass into or through every part of: sunshine permeating the room.
2. to penetrate through the pores, interstices, etc., of.
3. to be diffused through; pervade: Bias permeated the report.

–The Free Dictionary.com/Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Compensate

I will compensate my followers for missed words by posting double the 3freewordsaday for the whole of this week.

Compensate defined:  TRANSITIVE VERB

1. To offset; counterbalance.
2. To make satisfactory payment or reparation to; recompense or reimburse: Management compensated us for the time we worked.
3. To stabilize the purchasing power of (a monetary unit) by changing the gold content in order to counterbalance price variations.
The Free Dictionary.com/The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Commingle

Commingling among the extra free words today is a blog post explaining why each word begins with the same letter.

Commingle defined:  To become blended. To cause to blend together; mix. VERB–The Free Dictionary.com/The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Opine

Defined:  To opine is to share your thoughts or opinion. When you share your thoughts on an issue, this is an example of a time when you opine. VERB

Your Dictionary.com

to hold or express (an opinion); think; suppose: now usually said, with satirical or judgmental force, of a speaker regarded as pedantic, pompous, etc.  TRANSITIVE/INTRANSITIVE VERB

Your Dictionary.com (Webster’s New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio.  Used by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc.)

Sublimate

Defined:  1. to divert the energy of (a sexual or other biological impulse) from its immediate goal to one of a more acceptable social, moral, or aesthetic nature or use.  2. a. to sublime (a solid substance); extract by this process.  b. to refine or purify (a substance).  3. to make nobler or purer.  TRANSITIVE VERB

The Free Dictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.)

Individuate

Defined:  to make individual or distinct; specif., to differentiate from others of the same species or kind to form into an individual; develop as a separate organic unit  TRANSITIVE VERB

Your Dictionary.com

By now you know I’m a mystery reader.  Love them!  Especially if they are a series.  And Jeffery Deaver writes some knockout plots.  In The Stone Monkey (which has in my opinion the best secondary character in all his books), Lincoln Rhyme of The Bone Collector fame (Denzel Washington) once again schools his minions on evidence collection and analysis with his (in)famous bare bones and boiled down term, individuate.  It’s a great read and vocabulary building makes a nice excuse for picking it up and immersing yourself in it.

If you want some legal definitions of individuate, follow this link.

Illumined

Defined:  Variant of illumine;  illumined, illumining; to illuminate; light up TRANSITIVE VERB

Origin: ME illuminen < OFr illuminer < L illuminare

Your Dictionary.com

Another of my favorite word sources, both for vocabulary and for usage, are the British.  I first happened upon illumined in the Amelia Peabody (Emerson) historical mystery series by Elizabeth Peters.  The author was born and raised in Illinois and earned her Ph.D in Egyptology from Chicago’s Oriental Institute.  And thank goodness she took her passion and knowledge of Egyptology and parlayed it into the Amelia Peabody period mysteries about the Peabody/Emersons who hail from England!  Peters also writes other mysteries, but we all must have our utmost favorites, right?

Deteriorating

Defined:  to make or become worse; lower in quality or value; depreciate  INTRANSITIVE VERB

Your Dictionary.com

Deterioration can be both physical and existential.  An old house is deteriorating when it is in grave disrepair.  A situation would be deteriorating when more and more negative or disastrous events continue with no respite.

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Definitions: v. de·te·ri·o·rat·ed, de·te·ri·o·rat·ing, de·te·ri·o·rates

v.tr. To diminish or impair in quality, character, or value: Time and neglect had deteriorated the property.

v.intr. 1. To grow worse; degenerate: The weather deteriorated overnight. His health had deteriorated while he was in prison.
2. To weaken or disintegrate; decay: The nation’s highways are deteriorating at a rapid pace.

The Free Dictionary.com

Synonyms
atrophy, crumble, decay, decline, degenerate, descend, devolve, ebb, regress, retrograde, rot, sink, worsen, go to pot, go to seed

Merriam-Webster.com

Trump

Defined:  Trump is defined as to get the better of someone using a hidden resource.  An example of to trump is someone having an ace up their sleeve during a card game where an ace is the top card.  VERB

Your Dictionary.com

To have an ace up your sleeve, literally, is called cheating.  Don’t do that.  Figuratively, to have an ace up one’s sleeve means that one has a better and heretofore unannounced idea or solution that will be revealed in a group.

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Definitions:

  • any playing card of a suit that ranks higher than any other suit during the playing of a hand: a trump can take any card of any other suit
  • a suit of trumps
  • any advantage held in reserve until needed  NOUN
  1. to play a trump on (a trick, another card, etc.) when a trump was not led, often, specif., so as to take it thereby
  2. to surpass; outdo TRANSITIVE VERB

–Webster’s New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio. Used by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Abate

Defined:  1. To reduce in amount, degree, or intensity; lessen. 2. To deduct from an amount; subtract. 3. Law a. To put an end to. b. To make void.  TRANSITIVE VERB

–The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

I will not abate dictionary definitions in the 3freewordsaday posts.  Sometimes a nuance of a word can be learned from different entries.  And I’m pleased to note that the number of dictionaries, online and in print, have not abated.

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More Definitions:

1: to decrease in force or intensity 2 a : to become defeated or become null or void b : to decrease in amount or value

Merriam-Webster.com

Rankle

Defined:  To rankle is to cause someone to have long-lasting annoyance, anger or irritation.  When you say something to someone that you know will cause upset and anger, this is an example of a time when you rankle someone.  VERB (Your Dictionary.com)

To cause persistent irritation or resentment.
To become sore or inflamed; fester.

(The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th edition Copyright © 2010 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.)

“It rankles some people that he got the promotion, knowing he’s not at all qualified.”

Interestingly enough, this word comes from the Latin word for “a little snake.”  Read more here.

Proffered

Defined:  to offer (usually something intangible): to proffer friendship TRANSITIVE VERB (Webster’s New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio. Used by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons, Inc.)

If you don’t have the Weather Channel app, you might consider installing it on your smart phone.  I am not offering you the app; I am suggesting you get it because I recommend it.  (That’s not wink-wink, nudge-nudge.  I’m refining the use of our vocabulary word.)  I like the app not only because it gives me breaking weather information at my fingertips, but also because it has reward points that can be redeemed for gift cards.  The app when launched also offers, at times, other apps for your consideration.  For me, today’s proferred app was Volkswagen’s SmileDrive powered by Google.  It’s a social app that records your trip and interacts with others who use the app as you pass them on the road.  I don’t drive a V-Dub…I wonder if it will work for my Hyundai?

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More Definitions:

Proffer is defined as to offer something to be accepted. (verb) An example of to proffer is to submit a proposal for a conference. The definition of a proffer is an offer or offering. (noun) An example of a proffer is a description given by a lawyer as a preview of testimony.

(YourDictionary definition and usage example. Copyright © 2013 by LoveToKnow Corp.)

: to present for acceptance : tender, offer
Examples of PROFFER He proffered advice on how best to proceed.

<proffered his assistance in helping the two sides reach a compromise>
Origin of PROFFER

Middle English profren, from Anglo-French profrer, proffrir, porofrir, from por- forth (from Latin pro-) + offrir to offer — more at pro- First Known Use: 14th century

(Merriam-Webster.com)

Parse

Defined:  1a : to resolve (as a sentence) into component parts of speech and describe them grammatically

b : to describe grammatically by stating the part of speech and explaining the inflection and syntactical relationships 2: to examine in a minute way : analyze critically <having trouble parsing … explanations for dwindling market shares — R. S. Anson> TRANSITIVE VERB

1 to give a grammatical description of a word or a group of words

2 to admit of being parsed TRANSITIVE VERB (Merriam-Webster.com)

 

Parsing sentences in English class usually involved diagramming.  No way around it.  To parse words in everyday terms might mean picking sentences apart to glean a hidden or deeper meaning.  Do not confuse this process with pedanticism.

 

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Definitions:
1. To break (a sentence) down into its component parts of speech with an explanation of the form, function, and syntactical relationship of each part.
2. To describe (a word) by stating its part of speech, form, and syntactical relationships in a sentence.
3. a. To examine closely or subject to detailed analysis, especially by breaking up into components: “What are we missing by parsing the behavior of chimpanzees into the conventional categories recognized largely from our own behavior?” (Stephen Jay Gould).
b. To make sense of; comprehend: I simply couldn’t parse what you just said.
4. Computer Science To analyze or separate (input, for example) into more easily processed components.
v.intr.
To admit of being parsed: sentences that do not parse easily.

[Probably from Middle English pars, part of speech, from Latin pars (rtinis), part (of speech); see per-2 in Indo-European roots.]

(The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.)

Contravene

Defined:  1 to go or act contrary to : violate <contravene a law>

2 to oppose in argument : contradict <contravene a proposition>

TRANSITIVE VERB (Merriam-Webster.com)

  1. The overcrowded dance club contravened safety regulations.
  2. The unauthorized reproduction of the image contravenes copyright laws.

(Merriam-Webster.com)

Long night.  And even longer day.  Not just for me; aging issues can be a pain.  But my mother-in-law is recuperating after her fall.  She is resting comfortably and was from the point of her arrival at the E.R.  Not so much for her family who, growing weary with fatigue and worry, contravened the doctor’s instructions and gave her a glass of water.  I did not relish waiting for the tiny ketchup cup of ice chips to accumulate into a urine sample.  I have things to do.  Such things include composing my speech on how much we love her and that we may have to contravene her wishes to remain living alone.  She already has a titanium endoskeleton from two prior falls.  I can’t have my mother-in-law turning into the Terminator.  Can you imagine?!

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Definitions

1. To act or be counter to; violate: contravene a direct order.
2. To oppose in argument; gainsay: contravened the proposal. See Synonyms at deny.
[French contrevenir, from Medieval Latin contrvenre, to transgress, from Late Latin, to oppose : Latin contr-, contra- + Latin venre, to come; see gw- in Indo-European roots.]

(The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.)

Subsume

Defined:  1. to consider or include (an idea, term, etc.) as part of a more comprehensive one. 2. to bring (a case, instance, etc.) under a rule. 3. to take up into a more inclusive classification. TRANSITIVE VERB (Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.)

And we have the perfect example of subsume right at hand!  Subsume is a transitive verb.  The categories of 3freewordsaday include transitive verbs.  In fact all parts of speech, which will be included on this blog, are/will be subsumed under the heading Categories.

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Definitions

To classify, include, or incorporate in a more comprehensive category or under a general principle: “The evolutionarily later always subsumes and includes the evolutionarily earlier” (Frederick Turner).

[Medieval Latin subsmere : Latin sub-, sub- + Latin smere, to take; see em- in Indo-European roots.]

(The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.)

1. to incorporate (an idea, proposition, case, etc.) under a comprehensive or inclusive classification or heading
2. to consider (an instance of something) as part of a general rule or principle

[from New Latin subsumere, from Latin sub- + sumere to take]

(Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003)

Suss

Defined:  1. chiefly British : figure out —usually used with out 2. chiefly British : to inspect or investigate so as to gain more knowledge —usually used with out. TRANSITIVE VERB (Mirriam-Webster.com)

Another heard word.  Suss feels like the endeavor is hands on.  Maybe intellectually trying.  This term brings to my mind’s eye much paper pushing and physical research.  “It will take Detective Sprague weeks to suss out the origin of the screwdriver left at the scene.”  Or should I be an Inspector?  The term is British after all.

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Definitions

Slang
1. To infer or discover; figure out: “I think I’m good at sussing out what’s going on” (Ry Cooder).
2. To size up; study: “Suss out the designers in whom you are interested” (Lucia van der Post).

(The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.)

Slang
1. (often foll by out) to attempt to work out (a situation, person’s character, etc.), esp using one’s intuition
2. Also sus to become aware of; suspect (esp in the phrase suss it)

(Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003)